Sunday, October 27, 2013

Enterprise is Better Than Ease
Written by Jim Rohn

If we are involved in a project, how hard should we work at it? How much time should we put in?

Our philosophy about activity and our attitude about hard work will affect the quality of our lives. What we decide about the rightful ratio of labor to rest will establish a certain work ethic. That work ethic–our attitude about the amount of labor we are willing to commit to future fortune–will determine how substantial or how meager that fortune turns out to be.

Enterprise is always better than ease. Every time we choose to do less than we could, this error in judgment has an effect on our self-confidence. Repeated every day, we soon find ourselves not only doing less than we should, but also being less than we could. The accumulative effect of this error in judgment can be devastating. Fortunately, it is easy to reverse the process.

Any day we choose we can develop a new discipline of doing rather than neglecting. Every time we choose action over ease or labor over rest, we develop an increasing level of self-worth, self-respect and self-confidence. In the final analysis, it is how we feel about ourselves that provides the greatest reward from any activity.

It is not what we get that makes us valuable; it is what we become in the process of doing that brings value into our lives. It is activity that converts human dreams into human reality, and that conversion from idea into actuality gives us a personal value that can come from no other source.

So feel free to not only engage in enterprise, but also to enjoy to its fullest along with all the benefits that are soon to come.

Jim Rohn, America's Foremost Business Philosopher, reprinted with permission from Jim Rohn International © 2013. As a world-renowned author and success expert, Jim Rohn touched millions of lives during his 46-year career as a motivational speaker and messenger of positive life change. For more information on Jim and his popular personal achievement resources or to subscribe to the weekly Jim Rohn Newsletter, visit www.JimRohn.com.

Saturday, October 19, 2013

Yes, Success is Everything
Written by Jim Rohn

Someone once said to me that success isn't everything and I think I know what they really meant. I believe they really meant that money isn't everything, and I certainly agree with that. But I do believe that success IS everything.

First, you need to succeed to survive. We must take the seasons and learn how to use them with the seed, the soil and the rain of opportunity to learn how to sustain ourselves and our family.

But then second is to then succeed to flourish in every part of your life. Good question to ask mature people: “If you could do better, should you?” And I think almost everybody would answer the question in the affirmative. If you could improve your health, shouldn't you do that? If you can learn more, shouldn't you do that? If you could earn more and share more, shouldn't you do that? If you can improve your relationships and spirituality, shouldn't you do that? And I think that is what success is really all about

It is not just a destination that is set for everybody to try and go for. It is like Zig Ziglar said, “improving in every area of your life to see if you can't say with satisfaction at the end of the day, week, month and year, ‘I have made excellent progress this year, for myself, for my family, for my business, my career and my health.’” I think that kind of success everybody recognizes is legitimate and something we should all strive for.

Interesting phrase in the Bible that says strive for perfection—not that we can ever reach it. But it is in the striving, to be a little bit better today than yesterday, in our speech, our language, our health, everything we can possibility think of.

So yes, in my opinion, Success Is Everything!

Jim Rohn, America's Foremost Business Philosopher, reprinted with permission from Jim Rohn International © 2013. As a world-renowned author and success expert, Jim Rohn touched millions of lives during his 46-year career as a motivational speaker and messenger of positive life change. For more information on Jim and his popular personal achievement resources or to subscribe to the weekly Jim Rohn Newsletter, visit www.JimRohn.com. .

Sunday, October 13, 2013

The Compound Effect: Creatures of Habit
Written by Darren Hardy

Aristotle wrote, “We are what we repeatedly do.” Merriam-Webster defines habit this way: “An acquired mode of behavior that has become nearly or completely involuntary.”

There’s a story about a man riding a horse, galloping quickly. It appears that he’s going somewhere very important. A man standing along the roadside shouts, “Where are you going?” The rider replies, “I don’t know. Ask the horse!” This is the story of most people’s lives; they’re riding the horse of their habits, with no idea where they’re headed. It’s time to take control of the reins, and move your life in the direction of where you really want to go.

If you’ve been living on autopilot and allowing your habits to run you, I want you to understand why. And I want you to let yourself off the hook. After all, you’re in good company.

Psychological studies reveal that 95 percent of everything we feel, think, do, and achieve is a result of a learned habit! We’re born with instincts, of course, but no habits at all. We develop them over time. Beginning in childhood, we learned a series of conditioned responses that led us to react automatically (as in, without thinking) to most situations.

In your day-to-day life, living “automatically” has its definite positives. If you had to consciously think about every step of each ordinary task—making breakfast, driving the kids to school, getting to work, and so on—your life would grind to a halt. You probably brush your teeth twice a day on autopilot. There’s no big philosophical debate; you just do it. You strap on your seatbelt the minute your butt hits the seat. No second thoughts. Our habits and routines allow us to use minimal conscious energy for everyday tasks. They help keep us sane and enable us to handle most situations reasonably well. And because we don’t have to think about the mundane, we can focus our mental energy on more creative and enriching thoughts. Habits can be helpful—as long as they’re good habits, that is.

If you eat healthfully, you’ve likely built healthy habits around the food you buy and what you order at restaurants. If you’re fit, it’s probably because you work out regularly. If you’re successful in a sales job, it’s probably because your habits of mental preparation and positive self-talk enable you to stay optimistic in the face of rejection.

I’ve met and worked with many great achievers, CEOs, and “superstars,” and I can tell you they all share one common trait—they all have good habits. That’s not to say they don’t have bad habits; they do. But not many. A daily routine built on good habits is the difference that separates the most successful amongst us from everyone else. And doesn’t that make sense? From what we’ve already discussed, you know successful people aren’t necessarily more intelligent or more talented than anyone else. But their habits take them in the direction of becoming more informed, more knowledgeable, more competent, better skilled, and better prepared.

My dad used Larry Bird as an example to teach me about habits when I was a kid. “Larry Legend” is known as one of the greatest professional basketball players. But he wasn’t known for being the most athletically talented player. Nobody would have described Larry as “graceful” on the basketball court. Yet, despite his limited natural athletic ability, he led the Boston Celtics to three world championships and remains one of the best players of all time.

How did he do it? It was Larry’s habits—his relentless dedication to practice and to improve his game. Bird was one of the most consistent free-throw shooters in the history of the NBA. Growing up, his habit was to practice five hundred free-throw shots every morning before school. With that kind of discipline, Larry made the most of his God-given talents and kicked the butts of some of the most “gifted” players on the court.

Like Larry Bird, you can condition your automatic and unconscious response to be those of a developed champion. [It is] about choosing to make up for what you lack in innate ability with discipline, hard work, and good habits. It’s about becoming a creature of champion habits.

With enough practice and repetition, any behavior, good or bad, becomes automatic over time. That means that even though we developed most of our habits unconsciously (by modeling our parents, responding to environmental or cultural associations, or creating coping mechanisms), we can consciously decide to change them. It stands to reason that since you learned every habit you have, you can also unlearn the ones that aren’t serving you well. Ready? Here goes…

There are fundamental principles that can lead you to the most extraordinary achievements in business and beyond. The Compound Effect will share those principles and teach you how to earn true success.

This article is excerpted from SUCCESS magazine publisher Darren Hardy’s book, The Compound Effect.
Content republished with permission from Darren Hardy, Publisher of SUCCESS magazine. For more great insights, tips and strategies on success and achievement go to http://DarrenHardy.SUCCESS.com. More about Darren Hardy can be found at: http://DarrenHardy.SUCCESS.com/About.

Sunday, October 6, 2013

The Major Key to Your Better Future is You
Written by Jim Rohn

Of all the things that can have an effect on your future, I believe personal growth is the greatest. We can talk about sales growth, profit growth, asset growth, but all of this probably will not happen without personal growth. It’s really the open door to it all. In fact I’d like to have you memorize a most important phrase.
Here it is, “The major key to your better future is YOU.” Let me repeat that. “The major key to your better future is YOU.” Put that someplace you can see it every day, in the bathroom, in the kitchen, at the office, anywhere where you can see it every day. The major key to your better future is YOU. Try to remember that every day you live and think about it. The major key is YOU.

Now, there are many things that will help your better future. If you belong to a strong, dynamic, progressive company, that would help. If the company has good products and services you are proud of, that would certainly help. If there were good sales aids, that would help, good training would certainly help. If there is strong leadership, that will certainly help. All of these things will help, and of course, if it doesn’t storm, that will help. If your car doesn’t break down, that will help. If the kids don’t get sick, that will help. If the neighbors stay halfway civil, that will help. If your relatives don’t bug you, that will help. If it isn’t too cold, if it isn’t too hot, all those things will help your better future. And if prices don’t go much higher and if taxes don’t get much heavier, that will help. And if the economy stays stable, those things will all help. We could go on and on with the list; but remember this, the list of things that I’ve just covered and many more—all put together—play a minor role in your better future.

The major key to your better future is you. Lock your mind onto that. This is a super-important point to remember. The major key is you. A friend of mine has always answered when asked, “How do you develop an above-average income?” by saying, “Simple. Become an above-average person. Work on you.” My friend says, “Develop an above-average handshake.” He says, “A lot of people want to be successful, and they don’t even work on their handshake. As easy as that would be to start, they let it slide. They don’t understand.” My friend says, “Develop an above-average smile. Develop an above-average excitement. Develop an above-average dedication. Develop an above-average interest in other people.” He says, “To have more, become more.” Remember; work harder on yourself than you do on your job. For a long time in my life, I didn’t have this figured out.

Strangely enough, with two different people in the same company, one may earn an extra $100 a month, and the other may earn a $1,000. What could possibly be the difference? If the products were the same, if the training was the same, if they both had the same literature, the same tools. If they both had the same teacher, the same compensation plan, if they both attended the same meetings, why would one person earn the $100 per month and the other person earn the $1,000? Remember, here is the difference: The difference is personal—inside, not outside, inside.

You see the real difference is inside you. In fact, the difference IS you. Someone once said, “The magic is not in the products. The magic is not in the literature. The magic is not in the film. There isn’t a magic meeting, but the magic that makes things better is inside you.” And personal growth makes this magic work for you.

The magic is in believing. The magic is in daring. The magic is in trying. The real magic is in persevering. The magic is in accepting. It’s in working. The magic is in thinking. There is magic in a handshake. There is magic in a smile. There is magic in excitement and determination. There is real magic in compassion and caring and sharing. There is unusual magic in strong feeling. You see, all that comes from inside, not outside. So the difference is inside you. The real difference is you. You are the major key to your better future.

Jim Rohn, America's Foremost Business Philosopher, reprinted with permission from Jim Rohn International © 2013. As a world-renowned author and success expert, Jim Rohn touched millions of lives during his 46-year career as a motivational speaker and messenger of positive life change. For more information on Jim and his popular personal achievement resources or to subscribe to the weekly Jim Rohn Newsletter, visit www.JimRohn.com.

Friday, October 4, 2013

The Book Every Parent Must Read: Behind-the-Scenes of The Noticer Returns with Andy Andrews

The Interview:

What is The Noticer Returns about?

The Noticer Returns is about a mysterious old man named Jones who changes the lives of a group of ordinary families. Jones does this by “noticing” little things about people and life that most people miss. He is the “Noticer” to which the title refers. He uses that gift of noticing to give these parents an entirely new perspective on what raising children is all about.

Jones is actually based on a real person I met when I was a homeless 23-yearold living under a pier on Alabama’s Gulf Coast. His name really was Jones (“Not Mr. Jones, just Jones,” he’d always say) and he really did call himself a Noticer. He is one of the main reasons why I’m not still sleeping under a pier today.

Who would benefit from reading this book?

Anyone who wants to provide “the best” for their children, grandchildren, or any children whom they influence.

What exactly is “the best”?

There are many “good”s and “better”s, but there is only one “best.” And that is what Jones challenges several of the book’s characters to define. Curiously, when they do define it, they are left with a list of standards that even people of diverse beliefs can all agree are results they desire their children to have. As for what this list contains, you’ll have to read the book to find out!

Why did you choose to write this book in the form of a story?

Two reasons:
  1. It’s a lot more interesting to learn and discover real-life principles when they are revealed in the form of a story. Readers get to see the principles played out in the characters’ lives. It’s also a lot easier to convince people to read an entertaining story than any other type of book!
  2. The smart authors write non-fiction. Ha!
What’s the most important thing parents will learn from this book?

Parents are going to find answers to several questions that they haven’t even thought to ask.

There are so many common occurrences in raising children that people just can’t seem to figure out. For example, we all can think of at least one kid who had great parents, a great family, and an all-around great childhood…who suddenly went crazy as soon as he left the house for college or adulthood. And nobody can figure out how or why it happened!

So the most important thing parents will learn is how to parent according to principles that have already been harnessed by parents who have raised great kids…who go on to become great adults. It’s going to show readers how to pass a way of thinking down to their children so those children actually understand how to make good decisions when mom and dad are no longer around.

What are some unexpected surprises in the book?

Without revealing too much, I’ll say that Jones provides some much needed perspective on one issue that affects a lot of people and one issue that affects all people—Alzheimer’s Disease and death. I won’t say anything more! But I think readers will definitely be surprised in a good way.

What is the most common mistake parents are making?

The biggest mistakes most parents make (and believe me, I’m guilty of these too) seem very inconsequential. They’re little, day-to-day things that, at the moment, don’t seem like a big deal. For example, a few weeks ago I was explaining how to do something to my son, Austin. This was something I had explained before, and something that he didn’t think needed to be explained again, so while I was talking, he said, “I know I know I know.”

Now, at that moment, I could have done two things. The convenient thing would have been for me to put an angry look on my face and say, “Don’t speak that way to me. It’s disrespectful and I’m your father and you will respect me.” And that would have been the end of the conversation.

The inconvenient thing to do—which is what I ended up doing—was to explain a few things to Austin:
  1. Saying, “I know I know I know,” while an adult is talking to you is disrespectful.
  2. You are not a disrespectful kid, so I would hate for another adult to overhear you speaking to me that way and label you as disrespectful.
  3. People who are labeled as disrespectful do not get the same opportunities afforded to those who are labeled as respectful.
This slightly longer conversation not only corrected the problem, but it allowed me to show Austin the thinking behind why I was correcting the problem. Now, not only does he know that behavior is disrespectful, but he has a better understanding of why being respectful will benefit him as he gets older.

In the grand scheme of things, this seems like a small deal. And since we’re told over and over not to “sweat the small stuff,” we naturally think it shouldn’t concern us too much. Over time, however, those little things that we gloss over as parents end up painting the bigger picture of our children’s lives as they become adults. And that’s where I think so many parents get tripped up—taking extra time to illustrate their thought process.

What did you learn from writing this book?

I learned that even a small amount of perspective can change our lives. Because even the smallest amount of perspective can change how we are able to navigate hard times.

Andy Andrews is the New York Times best-selling author of The Noticer Returns.
Click here to get your copy today!