Sunday, April 27, 2014

Speak with Impeccability
Written by Jack Canfield

Most people speak without consciousness. Unaware of the true power of our words, we let thoughts, opinions, judgments and beliefs roll off our tongues without considering the impact they can have.

Successful people, on the other hand, are conscious of the thoughts they think and the words they speak – both about themselves and others. They know that words are powerful. Words can destroy relationships, lose sales and start wars. Words can just as easily be used to build self-esteem and self-confidence, nurture relationships and turn dreams into reality.

Successful people make it a habit to speak with impeccability. It means speaking from your highest self, with intention and integrity. It means aligning your words with your vision and goals.

What You Say Impacts Others
Your words put out energy and a message into the world – and they create a reaction in the people listening to what you have to say. You can uplift, support and encourage the people in your life as easily as you can stir up feelings of fear, anxiety, hostility and hopelessness. The choice is in your words and how you choose to use them.

You also are affected by the words you use. The reaction others experience in response to your message is typically returned to you multiplied. If I express love and acceptance to you, you will experience love for me. If I express judgment and contempt for you, you will judge me back. Do you want to be on the receiving end of loving and supportive messages or critical, negative and judgmental messages?

Speaking negatively also brings us down and focuses our attention on what we don’t want in life. Words have energy. Speaking negatively releases poison into the river of energy that is set up to bring us what we truly want.

Cultivating Impeccability
Here are four tips for speaking with greater impeccability.

1. Commit to being impeccable in your speech when talking to others. Before speaking, ask yourself whether what you want to say will advance your vision, mission and goals? Will it uplift the people who hear what you’re saying? Will it dissolve fear and create safety and trust?

2. Vow to be as honest as you can when interacting with others. Telling the truth keeps you in integrity. Lying separates you from your highest self and erodes others’ trust in you. Lying is the product of low self-esteem – the belief that you are not enough to get what you want. It’s also fueled by the false belief that you can’t handle the consequences of people knowing the truth about you and what you think.

3. Make the intention to uplift every person you interact with in some small way. You might do so by appreciating something about the other person or simply by using uplifting, positive words.

4. Refrain from gossiping. This destructive habit robs you of a clear mind, allowing others’ opinions and judgments to color your feelings toward and expectations of others. When you’re with people who want to gossip, change the subject, keep quiet, or walk away from the conversation. Other alternatives include clearly stating that you don’t want to participate in gossiping or saying something positive about the person who is the subject of the gossip.

What Do You Want to Create?
Everything you say produces an effect in the world. You are constantly creating something – positive or negative – with your words. Before you speak, think about what you want to create … and choose your words accordingly.

Jack Canfield, America's #1 Success Coach, is founder of the billion-dollar book brand Chicken Soup for the Soul©Inspirational Books)© and a leading authority on Peak Performance and Life Success. If you're ready to jump-start your life, make more money, and have more fun and joy in all that you do, get FREE success tips from Jack Canfield now at: www.FreeSuccessStrategies.com/.

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Life is Art
Written by Jim Rohn

In my years teaching people to be successful, I have seen that basically people break their lives down in to two major parts: wealth-building and the rest of their lives. Having done a lot of reflection on these two topics–wealth and life–I am coming to some new conclusions about how to perceive the two.

Until recently I thought that there was a significant difference in how we should tackle the two areas. In fact, I thought that the two topics should be addressed in almost opposite fashion. You see, wealth-building is just math. While life, life is art.

Think back with me to high school. Most of us were required to take math and most of us probably took art as well. Now, think about your final exams in the two areas. Your math paper was graded on hard facts. There is always just one answer in math. Math is a science. It is formulaic. You can know the outcome before it happens, every time.

But what about your final art project? Art is much more subjective. "Beauty," they say, "is in the eye of the beholder." There is no one right answer. Think of the different styles of the famous artists: Renoir, Monet, Picasso, Rockwell, Warhol. Different people find different styles beautiful, and that is what makes art, art.

So how does this fit with wealth-building and life?

Wealth-building is like math: If you add $1,000 to your retirement account each month and gain 7 percent interest over 25 years, you can know now how much you will have then. It is math. If you buy a rental property for $200,000 now and it increases in value by 3 percent a year, you know exactly how much you will be able to sell it for in 10 years. The beauty of math is in the knowing. You can work the system, set it on auto-pilot and the math does the work for you—and you know the outcome.

But life? Life is art. And that is the beauty of life. You do not know how it is going to turn out. Life, like art, is always changing. Different people provide different colors. When you make a mistake you can go back, erase it or even paint right over it. You can change the scenery. Life, like art, is ever evolving, and what looks good to one person is of no interest to another. And that is what makes life beautiful.

Another lesson I think we can draw is that in life we should do our math, but that life isn't made up of just wealth-building. Wealth-building should serve our ability to live our lives. Jesus, the master teacher, said that our lives are not made up of the abundance of our possessions. He didn't mean that possessions aren't good, just that wealth isn't what life is all about.

So let me ask you: Are you spending more time on your math or your art? Do your math. Everybody should do their very best at their wealth-building plan so they can take care of themselves and their families.

But life is about the art. What does your canvas look like? What kind of picture are you painting? What kind of pot are you creating? What kind of statue are you sculpting? Take your time, make bold strokes, use brilliant colors, and make of your life the most beautiful masterpiece that you can.

In other words, do your math so you can focus on your art.

Jim Rohn, America's Foremost Business Philosopher, reprinted with permission from Jim Rohn International © 2014. As a world-renowned author and success expert, Jim Rohn touched millions of lives during his 46-year career as a motivational speaker and messenger of positive life change. For more information on Jim and his popular personal achievement resources or to subscribe to the weekly Jim Rohn Newsletter, visit www.JimRohn.com.

Sunday, April 13, 2014

How Do You Attract Opportunity into Your Life?
Written by Jim Rohn

Someone recently asked me the question: “How can I have more opportunities come into my life?” Good question, but I think my answer surprised them a bit.

I bypassed the obvious (and necessary) points about hard work, persistence and preparation. They actually were very hard workers. And they had the great attribute of being seekers—they were on the outlook. But I felt maybe they were missing this next and most valuable point—attraction.

I always thought opportunities and success were something you went after, and then I found out that I needed to turn it around. Opportunities and success are not something you go after necessarily, but something you attract—by becoming an attractive person.

That's why I teach development of skills. If you can develop your skills, keep refining all the parts of your character and yourself, your health, your relationships, etc. so that you become an attractive person to the marketplace, you'll attract opportunity. Opportunity will probably seek you out. Your reputation will probably precede you and someone will want to do business with you. All of the possibilities are there by working on the philosophy that success is something you attract.

The key is to continue making yourself a more attractive person by the skills you have, the disciplines you have, the personality you've acquired, the character and reputation you have established, the language and speech you use—all of that refinement makes you more attractive to the marketplace.

Personal development—the never-ending chance to improve not only yourself, but also to attract opportunities and affect others.

Jim Rohn, America's Foremost Business Philosopher, reprinted with permission from Jim Rohn International © 2014. As a world-renowned author and success expert, Jim Rohn touched millions of lives during his 46-year career as a motivational speaker and messenger of positive life change. For more information on Jim and his popular personal achievement resources or to subscribe to the weekly Jim Rohn Newsletter, visit www.JimRohn.com.

Sunday, April 6, 2014

Life is a Laboratory
Written by Jack Canfield

Everyone has a dream.

Many of us simply lose sight of it or let it go because of some earlier disappointment, rejection, or lack of progress. The natural tendency is to protect ourselves from getting hurt again, so we deny our dream, afraid to reach out for the people, resources, and opportunities that could support it.

I want to share a quick story about my friend Catherine Lanigan. She had earned a college scholarship on her strengths as a gifted writer. Catherine’s Harvard professor gave her an F on her first short story and convinced her she had no talent. She wrote nothing more for 13 years.

Then one day in her small Texas town Catherine visited a movie set. When she expressed her desire to be a writer, one of the scriptwriters shot back, "B.S.! If you wanted to be a writer, you would have written."

When Catherine explained how her professor discouraged her, the scriptwriter replied, "An academic guy? What does he know? I write for a living. Tell you what. You go home and write something and send it to me, and I’ll tell you if I think you have any talent in the real world of commercial literature."

A year later, Catherine finished her novel and sent it to the scriptwriter, who loved it and sent it to his agent in New York. The agent also loved it and asked to represent her work. Catherine’s first novel was followed by numerous others including Romancing the Stone and Jewel of the Nile, which became a major motion picture.

Is there a dream buried deep within you? If so, you owe it to yourself—and the world—to fully express it.

First you need to get in touch with your dream. When you get in touch with the essence of who you are and what it is that really wants to come through you, it propels you forward, allowing you to overcome any obstacle, no matter how big.

Secondly, gather feedback from many people (but don’t let someone else’s opinion bury your dream as Catherine did for so long). Whether you’re venturing into a new career, proposing a project in your community, or developing a computer application, get as much feedback as you can. Weigh it; then follow your own instincts.

Finally, try things you’ve never tried before to see what works. When we were kids, we’d try anything, but now? Today a child having a computer problem will hit every button to get it to work. Many adults fear touching the wrong button will break it.

Embrace a spirit of curiosity and playfulness in your pursuit. If one thing doesn’t work, try another. If that doesn’t work, try something else. This can be great fun. Imagine life as one big laboratory—and keep experimenting until your dream yields the results you want.

Jack Canfield, America's #1 Success Coach, is founder of the billion-dollar book brand Chicken Soup for the Soul©Inspirational Books)© and a leading authority on Peak Performance and Life Success. If you're ready to jump-start your life, make more money, and have more fun and joy in all that you do, get FREE success tips from Jack Canfield now at: www.FreeSuccessStrategies.com/.